my Ogden~Cronin Genealogy
genealogy of the ogden & cronin families of massachusetts
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Thomas BLOOD

Male 1759 - 1835


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  • Born  6 Mar 1759  Mason, NH Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2, 3, 4
    Gender  Male 
    Deed  7 Sep 1822  Mason, Hillsborough Co., NH Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    Sold to Cheney Meriam 
    Occupation  Husbandman, Revolutionary War Soldier  [6
    Died  24 Jun 1835  Mason, NH Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 7
    Person ID  I076  My Genealogy
    Last Modified  13 Apr 2011 

    Father  Ebenezer Blood JR.,   b. 30 Jun 1727, Groton, MA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Nov 1800, Mason, NH Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Relationship  Natural 
    Mother  Sarah FISK,   b. 6 Feb 1730/31, Groton, MA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Dec 1825, Mason, NH Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Relationship  Natural 
    Married  15 Jun 1756  Hollis, NH Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married by  Rev Daniel Emerson 
    _MEND  Death of one spouse 
    Family ID  F056  Group Sheet

    Family 1  MOLLY,   d. 5 Jan 1801 
    Married  Abt 1783  [8
    Children 
     1. Sarah Russell BLOOD,   b. 18 Jun 1786, Mason, NH Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Oct 1831, Salem, MA Find all individuals with events at this location
     2. Polly BLOOD,   b. 14 Sep 1784, Mason, NH Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. UNKNOWN
     3. Ebenezer BLOOD,   b. 18 Jun 1786, Mason, NH Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. UNKNOWN
     4. Thomas Blood JR.,   b. 9 Jun 1788, Mason, NH Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. UNKNOWN
     5. Josiah BLOOD,   b. 17 Aug 1790, Mason, NH Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. UNKNOWN
     6. Phebe\Phoebe BLOOD,   b. 20 Aug 1797, Mason, NH Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. UNKNOWN
     7. infant BLOOD,   d. 6 Sep 1794, Mason, Hillsborough Co., NH Find all individuals with events at this location
     8. infant BLOOD,   d. 18 Oct 1999, Mason, Hillsborough Co., NH Find all individuals with events at this location
     9. infant BLOOD,   d. 20 Dec 1800, Mason, Hillsborough Co., NH Find all individuals with events at this location
     10. child BLOOD,   b. Abt 1790,   d. 6 Sep 1794
    Family ID  F044  Group Sheet

    Family 2  MARY,   b. Abt 1758,   d. 31 Jul 1843 
    Married  Between 1801 and 1820  [6
    Family ID  F055  Group Sheet

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 6 Mar 1759 - Mason, NH Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDeed - Sold to Cheney Meriam - 7 Sep 1822 - Mason, Hillsborough Co., NH Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 24 Jun 1835 - Mason, NH Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Maps 
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Notes 
    • Thomas was believed to have faught in the Battle of Bunker Hill along with both of his brothers. However, no evidence of that has been found, except the following written "genealogy", believed to have been written by Stephen H. Simon. Thomas was 16 years and 3 months old at the time of the Battle.
      "Genealogy: Fathers' grandfather and his two brothers were in the Battle of Bunker Hill. June 17, 1775. Grandfather Thomas Blood born in Mason, N.H. 1757 and died 1835, father of Sarah Russell Blood Simon, fathers' mother. The brothers names were Asa Blood and Ebenezer Blood Jr. Ebenezer never returned from the battle. Their fathers name was Ebenezer."

      Thomas is known to have faught in the War, having served in Washington's Army. He enlisted 23 Apr 1777, one month after his 18th birthday, and served for 3 years until 1 May 1780 as a Private in Captain Isaac Frye's Company of Colonel Scammel's 3rd New Hampshire Regiment. He was recruited by Frye on April 28 along with David Ball and Nathaniel Fish (or Nathan; possibly his uncle or cousin?? "Nathan" deserted May 1, 1778, possibly never returned from furlough?) on April 30. They marched to Fort Ticonderoga from May 2 until May 10, 1777. Frye returned home May 12 for a third group of recruits, returning to Fort Ti on June 25. Thomas faught and was injured during the Battle of Saratoga; appears to have missed the encampment at Valley Forge that followed due to "sick leave" and "furlough". He appears to have been part of the Sullivan Campaign of 1779. He was discharched at West Point.

      The 1777 Battle of Ticonderoga occurred between July 2 & 6, 1777. The "battle" consisted of military manoeuvres more closely resembling troop movements with minor skirmishes than an actual battle. General Burgoyne arrived in Quebec in May. By July 1 his 8,000 man army was 4 miles from Ticonderoga. Burgoyne gave the order to advance on July 2, and there were minor skirmishes that followed resulting in 7 American casulties and about 5 British. By July 4 they occupied Sugar Loaf (now known as Mount Defiance) high above the fort surrounding the defences of General Arthur St. Clair's under-strength force of 3,000 men. On the morning of July 5, St. Clair's war council made the decision to retreat, but to wait until nightfall since they were completely exposed. The British occupied the forts without firing a shot.

      According to Frye records (from Charlie Frye)
      (Schuyler, Army Commander; St. Clair, Division Commander; Poor, Brigade Commander; Scammell, Regiment Commander; Frye, Company Commander)
      They evacuated Fort Ti under St. Clair (Div. Cmdr) on July 6, 1777 and marched 16 miles to Hubbardton; after a pause, the main body of the army marched on to Castleton (2nd Lt. Sam Leeman missing along with Jonathan Foster & Aaron Oliver). On July 7, St. Clair marched 10 miles to Rutland, arriving around 9 AM, hoping to find stragglers from the Battle of Hubbardton*(1). St. Clair's forces marched all the way to Dorset (33 mi) where he writes Schuyler, they don't stay long. July 8, they marched into Arlington (15 mi) passing through Manchester, VT. From July 9 to July 12, St. Clair's forces make their way to Fort Edwards where they join Schuyler.
      On July 29, Schuyler moves the army south under pressure from Burgoyne (5 mi), and on the 30th they continue south to Schuylerville (7 mi); on the 31st they continue 16 miles to Stillwater.
      August 12 to September 7, Schuyler moves south; Poor's brigade is stationed 5 miles up the Mohawk River at what looks to be a ferry (Loudons Ferry), while the rest of the army moved to Van Schaik's island at the junction of the Mohawk and Hudson Rivers. On September 4, Captain Frye and a 40 man scouting party were ambushed by Fort Hunter Mohawk warriors who were moving north having abandoned Fort Hunter, loosing 9 men (the rank and file were from Livingston's 1st Canadian Regiment).
      On September 7, they move back to the main Army, as Gates has begun the process of moving the Army north. September 8 to 9, they arrive at Bemis Heights, encamped on the left wing under Arnold (the right wing was under Lincoln).
      (Gates, Army commander; Arnold, Division commander)
      September 13, arrive at Bemis Heights, encamped on left wing.
      September 19, they fought in the American center against Burgoyne's center (Pvt. Josiah Stone killed, and Ebenezer Drury taken prisoner. 1st Regiment to be recalled after Burgoyne's artillary was brought to bear).
      October 7, they fought on the left wind against Acland (Pvt. John Murphy, Sgt. Seth Shacklefield, and Cpl John Rawlins were killed).
      On October 11, Gates moved the army 15 miles north to stay near Burgoyne and to cut off his escape to the north. (no Division commander listed - maybe because Arnold had been injurred.)
      October 18 & 19, the army supplies and reorganizes (sick & furloughs) before marching to Valley Forge. Thomas Blood was listed as "Sick Absent" and "on furlough" for the Valley Forge rolls; he may have travelled to Charlestown December 17, 1777. The Army marched 32 miles to Albany. From October 24 to November 10, the Army marches 87 miles south to Fishkill, and then 20 miles to Peekskill on the 13th, on route to Valley Forge. On the 14th they continue 8 miles to Stoney Point.
      Around December 19, 1777 the army arrives at Valley Forge. Many of Frye's company were sick; he and his company were likely grouped with another small company. Nathan(iel) Fish deserted May 1, 1778 (but he had been listed as on Furlough?). Frye and his men at Valley Forge marched 12 miles on May 18, 1778 in Lafayette's Expedition to Barren Hill, and returned May 22, 1778.
      ...
      [the Battle of Monmouth was June 28, 1778 - as Washington overtook Clinton after he evaculated Philadelphia intending to concentrate his army in New York.]
      July 12 to August 4, 1778, Frye rejoins the Army at White Plains after being sick at Valley Forge in June and July (147 miles). Thomas Blood appears to have rejoined the Army by July 22, 1778 at the camp in North Castle; and is in White Plains August 5. They both appear to have missed the Battle of Monmouth, the last major battle in the Northern Theater.
      ...
      September 11, Poor's Brigade moves to Danbury for Winter Quarters (8 miles to Westchester on the 11th; 8 miles on the 12th; 8 miles to Ridgefield on the 16th; 7 miles to Danbury on September 18th);
      October 18 to 25, 1778, Poor's brigade moves to Hartford (62 mile march); [the rolls then list Blood at Camp Reading in November] and November 23 to 30th the brigade moves back to Danbury into winter quarters.
      December 5, 1778, an alarm is given and Poor's brigade marches to Bedford (21 mi). December 8 to 9 they return to winter quarters at Danbury.
      December 23, 1778 to January 20, 1779 Frye is on Furlough (marches 181 miles home).
      [from December 1778 through March 1779 Thomas Blood is listed in 2nd Captains Company, and On Command through February]
      ...
      April 1 to 25, 1779, Frye is on Furlough (marches 205 miles home). The rest of the Army appears to be at Camp Soldiers Fortune by April.
      ...
      May 17, 1779, (Washington, Army cmdr; Sullivan, Div cmdr; Poor, Brigade cmdr.; Dearborn, Reg cmdr.), march from Camp Soldier's Fortune through Fishkill toward Easton. They arrive in Easton May 26, 1779 and stay until June 18 when they march off to Wyoming.
      ...
      [The Sullivan Expedition (or Sullivan Campaign) began on June 18 when the army marched from Easton, PA until October 3, when it abandoned Fort Sullivan to return to New Jersey. There was only one major battle at Newtown (now Elmira) in which the army of 3,200 Continental soldiers decisively defeated about 1,000 Iroquois and Loyalists. Sullivan's army then carried out a scorched earth campaign, methodically destroying at least 40 Iroquois villages throughout the Finger Lakes in order to put an end to the Iroquois and Loyalist attacks against American settlements that had occurred the previous year.
      ...
      November 1 to 2 they march from Warwick to (probably) Suffern where they stay several days awaiting orders.
      November 8, 1779, they arrive at Pompton (4 PM) - Sgt. Levi Lamprey dies at Fishkill on 11/10, Cpl. Benj. Cates deserts the same day).
      By November 15/17, 1779 they are at New Windsor or Fishkill (Frye is "On Command", and was at an officer's meeting on the 14th by Pompton).
      December 1 to 2, Frye is meeting up with the company to hut at Danbury (8 men are discharged December 1, 4 more on January 25; and 6 others are on furlough).
      [Thomas Blood is discharged May 1, 1780 at West Point]

      *(1) The Battle of Hubbardton occurred early in the morning of July 7th 1777. On July 6, General Arthur St. Clair paused in Hubbardton to give the army rest while they awaited stragglers and the rear guard, the 11th Massachusetts Regiment under Colonel Ebenezer Francis. St. Clair and the main army continued to Castleton, leaving the Green Mountain Boys under Colonel Seth Warner behind, along with the 2nd New Hampshire Regiment under Colonel Nathan Hale. When the 11th MA arrived Warner decided, against St. Clair's orders, to spend the night rather than catching up with the main army. British General Simon Fraser had set out in pursuit of the American's earlier in the morning after discovering they had abandoned Ticonderoga. Baron Riedesel caught up with Fraser in the early evening and insisted they make camp. Fraser advanced to a site 3 miles from Hubbardton and camped for the night. At 3 AM Fraser's men broke camp and march toward Hubbardton. Riedesel's men left camp at 3 AM still behind Fraser. As the American's were forming up to march out of camp around 7 AM, the British crested the hill behind them. The 11th MA reformed into a line and unleashed a volley of fire at the British. After more than an hour of battle, Riedesels grenadiers arrived, and the American's raced away and scattered into the countryside. (wikipedia.org)




      Per NH Revelutionary War Pentioners, 1835 (p.705):
      Thomas Blood, private (rank)
      annual allowance: 96.00
      sums received: 181.60
      NH Continental Line (service desc)
      placed on roll: 9/30/1818
      commencement of pension: 4/14/1818
      age: 64 (doesn't make sense unless age at date restored-1823)
      dropped under act of 5/1/1820, restored 5/8/1823

      Per Gen. Abstracts of Rev War Pension Files Vol. I (p.304):
      "Blood, Thomas, S45597, NH Line, appl 8 May 1823 Hillsborough Cty NH aged 64 on 6 Mar last, in 1820 sol had a wife aged 63 & a grandchild (not named), on 7 Sep 1822 Thomas & Mary Blood sol land in Hillsborough Cty NH at town of Mason NH to Cheney Meriam, a Sarah Blood owned adjoining land but relationship?"

      War of 1812: (not sure if same Thomas)
      Thomas Blood 2nd Reg't (Hastings), Mass Militia
      Lt. at induction and discharge, roll box 19, roll exct. 602

      http://www.rootsweb.com/~nysarato/batlbl.htm
      Participants in the Battles of Saratoga:
      BLOOD, Thomas NH
      Private, Capt. Isaac Fry's co., Col. Scammel's regt.; served
      from 23 Apr 1777 to 1 May 1780. Ref NA02
      NA02 - National Archives; M246 series of payroll and roster records.

      Of the two battles of Saratoga, also known as the Battles of Bemis Heights or of Stillwater, the second was the first great victory of the Americans and was deemed by many historians to be the turning point of the Revolutionary War.

      The British campaign was designed to split the colonies by taking control of the Hudson River. General John Burgoyne was to advance south from Canada, General Barry St. Leger east along the Mohawk River and Sir Henry Clinton (replacing Sir William Howe) north from New York City. Neither St. Leger nor Clinton was successful, leaving Burgoyne's forces alone in the campaign. Burgoyne easily took Fort Ticonderoga but suffered a stinging defeat in an attempted raid on Bennington.

      Burgoyne continued south, crossing the Hudson River on September 13, 1777, halting near the Saratoga site of what is now the village of Schuylerville. The Americans, under the leadership of General Horatio Gates, assisted by Major Generals Benedict Arnold and Benjamin Lincoln, Colonel Daniel Morgan's corp of Indian fighters, and other Continental and Militia troops were entrenched at Bemis Heights. With American forces threatening his rear, Burgoyne attempted to break through on September 19th but the engagement was indecisive. He attempted a second breakthrough on October 7th, but was repulsed and forced to retreat eight miles back to old Saratoga. The British entrenched there, but surrounded by American forces and low on supplies, were forced to surrender on October 17th.

      PENSIONS: http://www.americanrevolution.org/pension.html
      If the soldier applied and receive a pension his pension number was prefixed by "S".
      The Law of 1818 provided that every indigent person who had served to the war's close, or for nine months or longer, would receive a pensions. When the law was rewritten in 1820, many names were removed from the pension rolls because they were not indigent.
      Pensions contain
      1. Soldier's name, rank, where enlisted, battles fought in, etc.
      2. Wife's name (or widow), date and place of marriage.
      3. Bible records of family members, as sometimes indigent "children" took up the pension.
      4. Place of residence of soldier, when enlisting, when applying, and other family members.
      5. Date of death of soldier (widow's pension).
      All of the Revolutionary War Pensions have been abstracted and are at most Archives. These are large books and include a number of volumes.
      Also, the Federal Archives have the original pensions on microfilm....reading these (as opposed to the abstracts) is quite interesting, because of details of exciting battles, and personal information.

      His pension file"
      http://persi.heritagequestonline.com/hqoweb/library/do/revwar/results/image?urn=urn:proquest:US;revwar;68946;52947;2;&polarity=&scale=
      username: 0fqqnrjh3p password: welcome

  • Sources 
    1. [S02529] Simons, Ruth, written notes.

    2. [S02181] GenForum - Blood.
      3/6/1759 - per Rev. War Pension
      4/6/1759 - per IGI?

    3. [S02543] The Story of the Bloods, Roger Deane Harris, (Privately Published 1960), 153.
      b. April 6, 1759 (March 6 on Pension Papers)

    4. [S02146] Genealogical Abstracts of Revolutionary War Pension Files, Virgil D. White, (The National Historical Publishing Company), p. 304.
      "appl 8 May 1823...aged 64 on 6 Mar last"

    5. [S02146] Genealogical Abstracts of Revolutionary War Pension Files, Virgil D. White, (The National Historical Publishing Company), p. 304.
      "...Thomas & Mary Blood sol land... to Cheney Meriam, a Sarah Blood owned adjoining land but relationship?"

    6. [S02543] The Story of the Bloods, Roger Deane Harris, (Privately Published 1960), 153.

    7. [S02543] The Story of the Bloods, Roger Deane Harris, (Privately Published 1960), 153.
      d. June 24, 1835 ae 77 "at his dwelling house in ... Mason." lived Mason NH Husbandman.

    8. [S02543] The Story of the Bloods, Roger Deane Harris, (Privately Published 1960), 196.